Showcase Your Architectural Prowess In Our December DIGITAL Issue

SA Builder – Architectural Feature – December 2019

The December 2019 digital issue of SA Builder will feature Architecture and Design – of any category or type – from residential to industrial to commercial.

Be sure not to miss this opportunity to share and showcase your project/s in this important edition which will also be distributed to our online readership of over 7 000 readers.

For details contact Wendy Ansell on 082 561 2232, or wendy@sabuilder.coza

Content and material deadline is 05 November 2019.

We look forward to your images and detailed description of your project.


 

Images:

Shaun Forster

lauriebakercentre.org

Paragon

SAISC

Rich Architects

Gareth Griffiths

CMAI Architects

Innovative Architecture Celebrated at SAIA KZN Inauguration and Awards Ceremony

Innovative Architecture Celebrated at SAIA KZN Inauguration and Awards Ceremony

Prof Ora Joubert keynote speaker, incoming president of the SAIA KZN, Patrick Smith and Musa Shangase of Corobrik

In Durban in August the South African Institute for Architects – KwaZulu-Natal Region (SAIA KZN) announced its 2019 Awards for Architecture – and also inducted its 2019/2020 president at a Corobrik-sponsored ceremony. Taking the reins of the SAIA KZN will be renowned South African architect, Patrick Smith.

Originally from the farming community of Creighton in KZN, Patrick Smith switched over from his intended agricultural studies to pursue his passion for architecture in 1985. He went on to establish the Kloof-based practice, Walker Smith Architects, with a former UKZN colleague, Dean Walker, in 2002. He has worked on a number of residential and commercial projects including the interior design for the Moses Mabhida Stadium.

Addressing the members of the architecture community, civic dignitaries and other honoured guests at the inauguration, Smith said he regarded the presidency as a massive privilege and looked forward to the work ahead.

Smith described SAIA KZN as a ‘voice for the architect’ within the province, given our national economic climate. “We have seen the demise of several large construction firms in the last few years as the building industry has slumped. Lack of investor confidence has affected our profession directly and it is at times like this when institutions such as ours have to support our members.”

In a fitting tribute, this year’s keynote speaker was professor Ora Joubert, the former teacher of the newly-inducted KZNIA president. Joubert is also the recipient of numerous design awards and including eight Awards of Merit from the SAIA and its affiliate chapters, the Corobrik House of the Year Award, three Dulux Colour Awards and a landscape design award.

This year’s audience was kept enthralled by Joubert’s talk which covered extracts from her recently published book entitled ‘10+ years 100 projects – architecture in a democratic South Africa’. The book documents the most meritorious final-year thesis projects from all the universities offering architectural tuition in the country.

“These projects have never before been documented and the information is gradually being lost,” explained Joubert. “The book also includes a record of the current architectural discourse within our socio-economic and political circumstances, as well as some innovative architectural interpretations.”

SAIA KZN welcomed 15 entries for this year’s awards with adjudication performed by an esteemed panel comprising Nadia Tromp of Ntsika Architects; Rozena Maart, professor and immediate-past Director of the Centre for Critical Research on Race and Identity at UKZN; Dr Silvia Bodei from SAIA; as well as members from SAIA KZN, Mfundo Maphumulo, Somers Govender, and Patrick Smith. Sydney Baillon and Walter Peters were appointed as convenors. All the 2019 award-winners will go forward to the Corobrik SAIA Awards of Merit and Excellence to be hosted in 2020.

Musa Shangase, Corobrik’s Commercial Director, congratulated both Smith on his appointment as well as the award winners at this year’s event: “Corobrik is proud to, once again, be supporting such a momentous occasion – one that places a spotlight on the incredible architectural talent of this province. The evening was made even more special by the induction of Patrick Smith as SAIA KZN president. His illustrious career and industry foresight will, no doubt, see the organisation continue to grow through innovative ideas and community collaboration.”

SAIA-KZN 2019 Awards for Architecture

1. Bond Square, 12 Browns Road cnr Albert Terrace, Point, Durban: Emmett: Emmett Architects CC

2. Amendments to Oliver Tambo House, 191 Prince Alfred cnr Gutridge Street, Pietermaritzburg: Ismail Cassimjee Architects

3. 90A_ Bellamont Road, Umdloti: Elphick Proome Architects

4. Magistrate Towers, 5 Magistrate Street, Mtunzini: Jeremy Steere Architect

5. ABSA Bank regional head office, 33 Richefont Circle, Ridgeside Office Park, Umhlanga: Elphick Proome Architects

Nelson Mandela University’s Riaan Huiskens wins Corobrik Architectural Student of the Year Award

Nelson Mandela University’s Riaan Huiskens wins Corobrik Architectural Student of the Year Award

Riaan Huiskens from the Nelson Mandela University is the 32nd winner of the Corobrik Architectural Student Award. He received his award at a ceremony in Johannesburg on Tuesday 7 May 2019. Riaan’s thesis is entitled ‘The design of a 3D printing facility in Central Port Elizabeth.”

The architects of the future will be the pathfinders who use the sophisticated technologies of the future to tackle the challenges of today whilst addressing both the learnings and the mistakes of the past, CEO of Corobrik, Mr Dirk Meyer, told key stakeholders in the world of academia, architecture and construction.

Speaking at the 32nd Corobrik Architectural Student of the Year Award at the Maslow Hotel in Sandton, Johannesburg, he said this applied to both this year’s winner – Riaan Huiskens from the Nelson Mandela University (NMU) – and the seven regional finalists whose work showcased the high calibre of young professionals that were entering this respected profession in South Africa.

During 2018, eight regional finalists from universities across the country were recognised and put forward to compete for a national title and a prize of R70 000 at the Corobrik Architectural Student of the Year Awards.

CEO of Corobrik, Dirk Meyer

Huiskens’ thesis, entitled The design of a 3D printing facility in Central, Port Elizabeth, explores how architecture is moving towards a paradigm shift with the development and incorporation of digital fabrication technology. This is extended into the discussion of recycling existing infrastructure and ties together both the heritage and ecological discourse and recognises the significance of historical urban elements and the finite quality of heritage resources within the city.

A historical building used as a host for the design of a 3D printing facility invites a dialogue between the architecture of the old and the expression of the new. The Premier Mill Building is identified as a historical urban artefact and the programme complements the historical background of the building, which was a granary. The primary architectural exploration focuses on the possibilities offered by 3D printing in the making and expression of architecture. The nature of the facility organises function before sign. Meaning the initial architecture lies in the systematic operations of the facility as a place of digital fabrication. Therefore, it focuses on successfully incorporating existing infrastructure as functioning components to the system. Secondly, the building is a sign of its function, a visual opportunity for a new architecture to reflect the nature of the facility,” he explains.

Andrew Palframan, head of the Department of Architecture at NMU, believes that this thesis addresses a very relevant topic as we head into the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

While increasingly mechanised and technologically advanced, the building process has essentially not changed for millennia. Riaan’s thesis creatively explores the potential for a fundamentally new way of making buildings, implementing cyber-physical systems that blur the lines between the physical, digital and biological spheres. The project lends insight not only into the systems and materials involved in this new way of making but comments on how these might be implemented in the preservation of our built heritage, he pointed out.

He said that awards such as the Corobrik Architectural Student of the Year Award brought public attention to architecture in general. “This is particularly important since architecture and the issues involved in its making are not generally part of public discourse in this country. Furthermore, the award programme is aspirational, driving quality through competition, promoting the adoption of contemporary issues and values and setting a benchmark for standards of excellence in architecture.”

Meyer thanked this year’s judges – Lauren Haiden from Paton Taylor architects in Durban, Rob Gillard from Intsika Architects in East London and Luyanda Mphahlwa, President of the South African Institute of Architects (SAIA) and director of Design Space Africa – as well as guest speaker, Ilse Woolf from Wolff Architects in Cape Town, whose presentation ‘Border Practice: Some attitudes towards architectural publications, exhibitions and design’ addressed the relationship between restorative justice, embedded research and juicy design aesthetics.

The creative output from our studio considers the past in terms of how to act restoratively and imaginatively when making interventions into the present,” she noted.

Meyer also noted that Corobrik, too, believed in the fusion of past and present. One of the company’s most celebrated products – face-brick – demonstrated how sophisticated research and development could lead to the introduction of innovative new products born from technology dating back to 7 500 BC.

Like their predecessors, the recently launched new Corobrik black and white face bricks were durable, non-toxic, reusable, energy and thermally efficient and low maintenance. Manufactured using some the latest technology in sophisticated eco-friendly gas fired kilns which minimised energy usage and emissions, they nevertheless catapulted a tried and tested building material from the realm of the conservative and historical into the new age of modern, dramatic architecture.

Riaan Huiskens synopsis.

THE DESIGN OF A 3D PRINTING FACILITY I N CENTRAL PORT ELIZABETH.

High-tech architecture is moving towards a paradigm shift with the development and incorporation of digital fabrication technology. This interest is extended into the discussion of recycling existing infrastructure. In this treatise, a topic which ties into both the heritage and ecological discourse. It recognises the significance of historical urban elements and the finite quality of heritage resources within the city.

A historical building used as a host for the design of a 3D printing facility invites a dialogue between the architecture of the old and the expression of the new. The Premier Mill Building is identified as a historical urban artefact and the programme complements the historical background of the building, which was a granary. The primary architectural exploration focuses on the possibilities offered by 3D printing in the making and expression of architecture. The nature of the facility organises function before sign. Meaning the initial architecture lies in the systematic operations of the facility as a place of digital fabrication. Therefore, it focuses on successfully incorporating existing infrastructure as functioning components to the system. Secondly, the building is a sign of its function, a visual opportunity for a new architecture to reflect the nature of the facility.

Riaan Huiskens biograaphy

I was brought up in the presence of an architectural mind, exposing me to simplified thinking and challenging the status quo. My school career provided a solid foundation towards studying architecture and my interest in photography aided with visualisation and composition.

There’s no beating an original

There’s no beating an original

Secunda Mall
Photo: Gareth Griffiths

By Gareth Griffiths

Over decades, ZINCALUME® has become a household name within the building industry. When specifying premium high performance metallic coated roofing and cladding materials, this original and trusted brand remains the roofing material of choice for specifiers, says the manufacturer.

First made in the late 1970’s, ZINCALUME has a long and distinguished pedigree, having been constantly improved over time. Manufactured and marketed by BlueScope, a reported 28 million tonnes of these zinc-aluminium coated products worldwide have been sold since inception – as verified by the Zinc-Aluminum Coaters Association (ZAC).

The 55% Al-Zn technology is licensed internationally by BIEC International Inc., a BlueScope subsidiary. In certain countries, the technology is marketed as GALVALUME®. In the mid 2000’s, the acrylic surface resin applied to coils of the product at the factory was upgraded, yielding significant advances in performance and formability.

A registered trademark of BlueScope Ltd, ZINCALUME steel was developed in association with Bethlehem Steel in the USA and perfected by Australian scientists at the Port Kembla research laboratories in New South Wales.

The choice of roofing material can affect the amount of solar energy that enters a building, affecting climate control inside the building and the comfort of occupants. To mitigate against heat ingress, ZINCALUME steel has an attractive, shiny appearance designed to keep heat out by limiting solar absorptance. All roofing products are subject to weathering, however, BlueScope’s product will stay brighter for much longer than alternatives, providing approximately twice the thermal performance of other commonly used materials such as weathered galvanised steel and fibre cement/asbestos.

ZINCALUME steel continues to deliver strong thermal performance throughout the life of the product. ZINCALUME is also extremely easy to form and work with”, says Hanekom. “It stays brighter for longer and due to its lightweight steel character. It is the architect’s dream material for curves and shapes, having been formed into a variety of curved surfaces. A good example of this is the roof over the departures terminal at Cape Town International Airport, completed in time for the 2010 FIFA soccer world cup and impressively shaped like an aircraft wing. Viewed from the air, this gives a stunning example of how versatile this product is.

The ZINCALUME roof at Cape Town International Airport is a stunning example of how versatile this product is.
Photo: Gareth Griffiths

The corrosion-resisting benefits of the product are considerable, and a special AZ 200 (both sides coated with 200 g/m2 of Al-Zn coating) version is available for use within the 5 km distance of the sea or in areas where there is a strong industrial fallout.

Because the metallic coating consists of 55% aluminium with the 43.5% zinc (the balance being Silicon), on a minimum coating mass both sides of 150 g/m2 in total, the user gets a highly effective degree of sacrificial anodic protection over the steel substrate meaning that the product may last at least four times longer than conventional zinc coated steels. ZINCALUME steel exhibits a more complex coating structure with both aluminium- and zinc-rich areas. The zinc-rich area provides excellent sacrificial protection, while the aluminium-rich area provides durable barrier protection. It is the combination of these two characteristics that make this unique product durable and effective against corrosion.

All this means that a special corporate warranty of performance can apply when product is fitted in an approved way”, adds Hanekom.

Mbombela Stadium
Photo: Grant Duncan-Smith

Noteworthy projects

ZINCALUME has been used extensively throughout South Africa on a number of high profile projects.

BlueScope customer, Clotan Steel expertly formed ZINCALUME into its Craft Lock profile in use at the Secunda Mall, as specified by architectural firm, LP Architects. The double-story mall was completed late in 2013.

Other examples of projects have included the Mbombela Stadium, Maponya Mall, Soweto, various integrated housing projects and more recently the roof over the massive Pepkor Distribution Centre in Hammarsdale.

Pepkor Distribution Centre, Hammarsdale Photo: Reinhard Swanepoel

If the good name of your practice is on the line, make sure our brand name is on the steel. Look for the brand that identifies the long lasting guaranteed performance of genuine ZINCALUME by BlueScope. It’s stamped on the underside of the roof sheet. Why risk your reputation by using generic Al/Zn coated steel when you can enjoy peace of mind by using genuine ZINCALUME steel?” he asks.

BlueScope Steel Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd

T: +27 21 442 5420 Arno.hanekom@bluescope.com

E: Arno.hanekom@bluescope.com

W: www.bluescope.co.za

Zeitz MOCAA Museum – a work of architectural and engineering beauty

Zeitz MOCAA Museum – a work of architectural and engineering beauty

View of Zeitz MOCAA in Silo Square. Image: Heatherwick Studio. Photo: Iwan Baan

By Gareth Griffiths

The historic grain silo situated in the Victoria and Alfred Waterfront dates back many years to a time when most of the country’s trade was conveyed on the high seas or via steam train. Completed in 1924, the Silo dominated the skyline of the city at 57 m tall.

Constructed by SA Railways and Harbours, the facility consisted of a suite of buildings including the storage annex, elevator building, dust house, dust cyclone and track sheds. The facility processed hundreds of thousands of tons of wheat, maize, soya and sorghum. It was sited to take advantage of its connectivity to the docks and the supporting rail infrastructure. An iconic building, it is considered an important contributor to Cape Town’s urban character. Consequently, it is heritage-listed by Docomomo South Africa (See http://www.docomomo.com and https://goo.gl/CgFD3O) . By 2001, the old Silo had become redundant.

The Silo District

Atrium vault, Zeitz MOCA Museum. Image: Heatherwick Studio. Photo: Iwan Baan

The Silo now lends it name to and forms the centre piece of a new district within Cape Town’s famous V&A Waterfront, a redevelopment project which started in 2010 as a mixed commercial, residential and leisure hub to the east side of the V&A and connecting it with the CBD.

With the completion of a massive re-purposing and refurbishing programme at the former grain Silo, the Silo District is almost complete.

Architectural photojournalist, Gareth Griffiths, a materials scientist by academic training, has been tracking and documenting the redevelopment of the Silo District at the V&A Waterfront. Of particular fascination has been the role played by the original concrete, cast in the 1920’s and reaching maximum strength by the time the building was re-purposed. According to lead design architect, Thomas Heatherwick of the famed Heatherwick Studios in London “We expected a rather cold surface inside the museum, but as we began to work with portions of the old concrete, we realized that it imparts a rather unique character to the building inside – a rather warm one at that.”

Zeitz MOCCA Museum. Image: Gareth Griffiths.

Technologies applied

The final phase of the grain silo project has been the completion and handover of the building to the used partly as a boutique hotel which opened early in 2017 but principally as as the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa (MOCAA) which took place in September 2017.

But how does an organic building such as a grain silo morph into a breathtaking gallery, housing a premier art museum and a boutique hotel?

iPrincipally, the former silo consisted of two functional areas:

An elevator building which received, hoisted and then gravity-fed incoming grain from a rail loading point to various storage bins inside the complex.

The storage annex – the major storage areas consisting of 42 large individual silo ‘cylinders’ measuring 5 m diameter by 30 m high.

By clearing out a portion of the highly compartmentalized internal structure it was possible to create a series of exhibition spaces.

The intention was to convert most of the total existing volume to 80 separate gallery spaces, education spaces, reading rooms, meeting and conference space, plus a huge atrium area beyond the main entrance, rising 30 m and 20 m across. This atrium occupies the space of 12 of the former silo cylinders and is arguably the most imposing feature of the new building. Walking into this chamber, one is given the impression of being in space – weightless and shaped with massive curved dimensions. Suspended overhead, the impression of zero gravity is provided by gigantic ‘hanging’ silo cylinders (as cut) which form the concentric ring arch above.

Zeitz MOCAA Museum. Image: Heatherwick Studio.

In the words of Thomas Heatherwick: “Inside we were in danger of losing the extraordinary cellular structure, so we created a space that would help the visitor understand the building. So, you would walk in and navigate around. We took the idea of taking just one of those billions of grains of corn so that we could scale it up and use it as a model for the cutting tool to cut through.”

A core concept in reinforcing the strength of the remaining silo tubes so that they could be left in place and cut to the architect’s design, is the use of an inner concrete ‘jacket’. Using concrete supplied by AfriSam to engineer’s specification, the inner circumference of each silo tube was re-lined with 200mm thick reinforced concrete to its exact cut dimension.

Atrium vault, Zeitz MOCA Museum. Image: Heatherwick Studio. Photo: Iwan Baan

The top of the bins is capped with a glass roof which lets light enter the atrium from above. The bottom of the atrium is formed by graded steps that naturally contour the rounded space forming a flexible amphitheatre space that can be used for both events and displays.

In addition, a rooftop floor is dedicated to a restaurant, an education centre and a rooftop sculpture garden. It is from this level that visitors may embark on their ‘walk of faith’ across a high-performance glass floor that looks down into the atrium. Visitors arrive on this level by using one of two scenic lifts. These lifts operate inside two of the cut-away silo cylinders – with a view into the atrium. A third adjacent partly cut-away silo provides the third panoramic option – a steel spiral staircase. There are also conventional service lifts and the usual fire escape staircases, in line with standard building safety requirements.

By way of a design element that is a first in Africa, Zeitz MOCAA is serviced by by Category A climate control in the galleries. The technology has been endorsed by the International Council of Museums (ICOM) and is used in internationally renowned galleries such as Pompidou Metz, Pulitzer and Paul Klee.

Zeitz MOCCA Museum. Image: Gareth Griffiths.

The technology offers the highest level of protection to a collection and is the most advanced climate control technology available at present. It will allow MOCAA to exhibit any piece of art, no matter how fragile. In line with other V&A Waterfront buildings, much of the climate control is based on renewable energy – in this case the chillers utilise the district sea water plant.

Official opening

Of course, the official opening of the Museum in late September was the most remarkable affair, with developers functions, an international press conference attended by media from all around the world and an official public opening presided over by Archbishop Emeritus and CT Mayor Patricia de Lille – veterans in the struggle and fittingly opening the Zeitz MOCAA on the Heritage Day long weekend.

Archbishop Emeritus and the Mayor of Cape Town, Patricia de Lille, fittingly opened the Zeitz MOCAA Museum on Heritage Day

The mark of any advanced civilisation is the collective achievements of that civilisation. If we understand each other better, which really is what art does, we create a world we all want to live in. I think that is what is so extraordinary about this moment – this museum – and the collective vision and labour of those that brought it to fruition. This museum is a symbol and an icon of the confidence we feel about being Africans, the confidence we feel about our place in the world” said Mark Coetzee, Executive Director and Chief Curator.

I built my collection with a museum in Africa always in mind – the fact that these works will now be accessible to all is a very emotional thing for me personally and ultimately gives the art true purpose,” said Jochen Zeitz, Co-Founder and Co-Chairman.

Professional team

Design architect: Heatherwick Studio

Executive architects: Van der Merwe Miszewski (VDMMA), Rick Brown Associates (RBA) and Jacobs Parker

Principal Agent

and Project Manager: MACE

Main Contractor: WBHO

Structural Engineers: Arup and Sutherland Engineering

Mechanical Engineers: Arup

Electrical Engineers: Solution Station

Façade Engineers: Arup

Independent

Commissioning Agent: Matrix

Specialist concrete supply: AfriSam

iArticle by Gareth Griffiths – All right reserved